Skip to content

Caroline’s summer reading list

July 29, 2008

Well, it’s time for yet another summer reading list. This one is brought to you by our fabulous Caroline, who always posts so faithfully on the blog.

Summer Reading List 4

Caroline Anderson, Communications Program Assistant

Guests of the Sheik, by Elizabeth Warnock Fernea
What do we really know about Iraq, this country with which the United States is intimately involved? Written in 1965, this “Ethnography of an Iraqi Village” is a memoir, telling the story of Fernea, a young bride who accompanied her sociologist husband to live in an Iraqi village for two years. It is a picture of Iraq unaffected by Saddam Hussein or the United States army.

Salvador, by Joan Didion
In this short novel (only about 100 pages), Joan Didion focuses her shrewd commentary on 1982 El Salvador. She recounts a few weeks spent in the country on assignment for The New York Review of Books. Though the politics of El Salvador are largely ignored today, reading this book offers a good depiction of living with unrelenting terror on a daily basis.

The Plague (La Peste), by Albert Camus
A classic novel about what happens when a disease quarantines the city of Oran, Algeria. How does it relate to FCNL’s work? By raising questions about the role of civil society and what happens when it breaks down.

Email the Author | Del.icio.us | Digg | function fbs_click() {u=location.href;t=document.title;window.open(‘http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=’+encodeURIComponent(u)+’&t=’+encodeURIComponent(t),’sharer’,’toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436′);return false;}Facebook

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: